© accioloki

aaajmachine:

peppapigvevo:

coconuttygrey:

literaryreference:

equivocationandredherring:

His and Her Royal Highness

Is this real?  

No, it’s a mass hallucination on the part of American children of the ’90s.

(Or a 1995 made-for-TV version of Rogers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella, if you prefer.)

This was the best.

this is the only version of cinderella that matters

Interracial parents and Filipino son. Never ever did I question whether or not they were a family.

posted 7 hours ago | via | © | 244854 #me in apush

leovaldezly:

pjo ship weeks:
↳[week four: Charles and Silena] (art by viria)

    Here’s my statement concerning Nico in The House of Hades:

One of the most important reasons I became a teacher was to advocate for marginalized children – those who are bullied or misunderstood, those who feel lost and alone. As a middle school student myself, I certainly felt that anguish. As a middle school teacher, it was critical to me that all my students saw my classroom as a safe, supportive environment where they could be honored for who they were and express themselves without fear.

I’ve taken the same approach with my writing. It’s essential to me that young readers find a variety of relatable, positive role models in my books. Every child can be a hero. No child should be shamed or shunned for being different.

Nico’s sexual orientation became clear to me the longer I wrote about his character. It was not something I planned. I had no agenda. But when I realized this was a major part of his life experience and the reason for so many of his difficulties with the other characters, it would have been a disservice to his character, the plot of the books, and all my readers simply to sweep the issue under the rug and pretend it didn’t exist. Turning a blind eye to children’s needs is never an acceptable answer.

I’ve been lucky enough to teach all sorts of students – fifth grade to twelfth grade, rich and poor, from numerous ethnic backgrounds, with diverse religious traditions and a variety of learning differences. I’ve also taught gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students. Some self-identified as early as elementary school. Some came to terms with their sexual orientation later in high school. Most had a hard time during the middle grades, which are tough years for any child. All my middle school students enriched my classroom. They made me a better teacher and a better writer for children, and they all deserve my support.

I am committed to writing appropriate books for the middle grades. This means no bad language, no gratuitous or explicit violence, and no sexual content beyond what you might find in a PG-rated movie – expressions of who likes whom, holding hands, and perhaps the occasional kiss. The idea that we should treat sexual orientation itself as an adults-only topic, however, is absurd. Non-heterosexual children exist. To pretend they do not, to fail to recognize that they have needs for support and validation like any child, would be bad teaching, bad writing, and bad citizenship.

Having said that, a good book, like a good classroom, should raise questions, not insist on a particular set of answers. It certainly should not ignore difficult questions. Whatever a family’s moral and religious beliefs on the topic of sexual orientation, I hope The House of Hades will provide an opportunity for parents to talk to their kids about what they believe, and why they believe it. Most importantly, I hope the story continues to entertain and keeps kids reading!

~Rick Riordan (x)

I love this so much. Favorite line: The idea that we should treat sexual orientation itself as an adults-only topic, however, is absurd. Non-heterosexual children exist. To pretend they do not, to fail to recognize that they have needs for support and validation like any child, would be bad teaching, bad writing, and bad citizenship.

(via joie-means-joy)

posted 1 day ago | via | © | 4649 #beautiful #percy jackson

gayhellchild:

ive been livetweeting my pjo reread so i haven’t been posting much abt it here but please god look at this. hades, a millennia-old deity, covering his ears as his small gay italian son flaps his arms around and yells at him

posted 1 day ago | via | © | 11184 #im CRYING #LOTR

durinsheir:

elvenkingthrandy:

why does this look like a love story

image

image

 via durinssons

mikkaybear:

inclusive-graceling:

leavemealonetoread:

inclusive-graceling:

iheartyea:

The “awww” you make when you find Archer’s jealousy cute :’3


Currently reading: Fire by Kristin Cashore; #Graceling series

Except it’s not SUPPOSED to be cute. Kristin Cashore intended this to be posessive and creepy. Because it is. Let’s break this down:

1. Fire can’t even like another guy’s company without Archer becoming paranoid she fancies him. They’ve known each other practically their whole lives, and yet he has no trust in her whatsoever. Even when it’s clear what she appreciates is that Tovat’s strong-mindedness means he won’t harass, gawke, or act like a buffon around her.

2. Archer’s not willing to have a dialogue about this, because that might mean confronting the fact his jealousy is unreasonable. Instead, he tries to guilt her into submission by underhandedly implying she has a crush on Tovat. Then, when that doesn’t work, he straight up decides the guy isn’t allowed near her anymore.

3. He specifically says this to her. He WANTS Fire to know he’s choosing to exercise a form of control over HER life.

You know the kind of people who do things like this? Abusers. These are abuse tactics used to manipulate victims.

It’s not cute that Archer’s incredibly insecure or that he thinks this is an acceptable way to act. It’s unhealthy and dangerous. And more people need to recognize that, because if you can’t spot it in a book, how will you ever spot it in real life?

This esp bugged me because of Fire’s powers. She has trouble being around other people, and she specifically told Archer that she liked Tovat because “he guards himself,” but Archer doesn’t seem to care about Fire’s comfort at all. 

Archer is Fire’s family and everything about his death was heartbreaking, but their relationship was ~complicated~ and stuff like this is why.

  • he has feelings for her she doesn’t return
  • he doesn’t care what she wants and acts like he has a right to her anyway (this is a separate issue that would exist even if he weren’t in love with her)

This is rly important, too. On top of being paranoid, insecure, and possessive, Archer is also incredibly SELFISH. His feelings and wants always have to trump Fire’s, no matter how irrational they are.

This is why she insists on never moving further than friends-with-benefits. Because if this is how he acts when they’re not even in a committed relationship, imagine how much worse he’d be when they are.

I would like just to mention that everything said above is 110% accurate and true but also reiterate that Fire loves Archer. Which is why she lets things like this slide, or ignores them, or brushes them aside (though later realizes she should have been more firm from the start). But Fire also understands that letting him go when he needs to be let go is a way of showing her love, too.

Not that this means we as readers have to or should love Archer—but Fire loves him, and she loved her father, and it doesn’t make it rational or right but it is fact nonetheless.

nico: making my way downtown, walking fast
jason: hey nico wanna talk about it
nico: walking faster

heytinafey:

BEY’S VOCAL ACROBATICS ARE ALL THAT I LIVE FOR  

miinza:

Warm ups with Piper<3 i really need to figure what my style is


Mouse Rat 5,000 Candles in the Wind
    He who fights with monsters should be careful he doesn’t become a monster himself. Unless that makes him more effective at fighting monsters. Like he becomes a badass werewolf who knows how to use a sword and has magic armor. That’d be so rad.
— Nietzsche (via doc-sarge)
bastille - oblivion

Are you going to age with grace?

Are you going to age without mistakes?

art by burdge.